books

YA Psychologist

What is your bookish problem? If you’re a bookworm, you have probably encountered a lot of heartache for a lot of reasons. So today, I’m here to help diagnose you and offer you some counselling.

-Shanti

psychologist

Patient # 1: TBR sufferer

Patient: I don’t know what to do. My TBR is trying to kill me. I have so many books– books I bought, books I have from the library, audiobooks, ebooks, and arcs and I don’t know what to read, least of all what to read next. I want to read all of the books, but there are too many. I can’t survive this. *weeps*

Psychologist: TBR’s are terrible, I know. But you need to come to terms with the fact that, no matter how hard you try, you will never be able to read all of the books you want to. Once you internalise that fact, you can start to think about which books you really want to read. Is there something that you’ve heard a lot about, and own already? Is there a book that sounds so you you must feast your brain on it? Read those books, enjoy them (hopefully) and try not to panic. Panicking prevents reading from being fun.

 

Patient # 2: The Book Planner

Patient: I’m helpless. I spend all my time obsessing over books and making charts of when they come out and I have a spreadsheet of where and when I’m going to buy them and all the interviews the author ever gave and I need to check all the hashtags for the books every day. This takes up all my time, and now even my book reading friends think I’m weird.

Psychologist: It’s great that you love books so much. Still, planning around all the release dates can be very stressful. I recommend that you have a set amount of time for organising books, and then don’t go over that amount. You don’t really need to do very much, it’s the publishers job to monitor the release dates and everything. Give yourself a certain number of books, the ones which you’re most excited for, and preorder them, or ask your library to preorder them. That way, they’ll come when they come and you’ll be ready for it.

 

Patient # 3 : The Bookterneter

Patient: I love books and I love reading. But recently I’ve found that I spend more time on bookstagram and bookter and booklr and goodreads and booktube and book blogs than I do actually reading. As well as not reading, all this time means that I get really jealous of other peoples books when I hear so much about them, and I keep getting halfway through a book then stopping, because I’ve heard of another I want to read. I just love all the community around books online, and I don’t want to just leave it, but I still want to spend more time reading. How can I not be so distracted?
Psychologist: Well, first off, it’s people like you, who get people excited about books, who are really important to publishers. You are helping the whole book community by spending time online, but the reading books is still the uniting factor. If you struggle this much with being distracted (which is okay! It happens to the best of us!) then turn your wifi or data off– or outright shut down your device– for an amount of time you set yourself, which should be just for reading. And then you can come back to the internet and share your love or hate about the book.

Patient # 4: The book-ripped-my-heart-out-and-I-can’t-recoverer

Patient: I read this book. I read it six weeks ago. It was the end of a series. I had been anticipating it since I read the previous book, and I was so happy to have it in my hands. I read it, fast, and I loved it, but at the end there was a horrible plot twist and something bad happened to my favourite character. I left the world of the book when I closed it’s pages, but the story has been haunting me. I often find myself sobbing, because I’m thinking about the book. I can’t read, because the only story I can think about is that one. *bursts into tears*

Psychologist: It’s okay, it’s okay. Well actually, it isn’t. I can’t tell you that it’s just a book, because it isn’t just a book to you, is it? The book was a home to you, a place of refuge, a place of belonging, and you can’t just read another book while you’re still attached to this one. That said, sometimes the pages of another book is the best place to find recovery. So I suggest that you write a list of what you loved about the book you read. Then you can use that information to inform your next step. You could write fanfiction. You could make a tumblr account entirely dedicated to the book. You could reread the series. You could read another book that shares some of the things you loved about this one. There are so many options on the road to recovery.
Have you ever experienced any of these? What are your main bookish problems, and do you tell the people around you about them? Tell me in the comments!

Advertisements

22 thoughts on “YA Psychologist

  1. AWWW I AM SO PATIENT #1 RIGHT NOW. (and have also repeatedly been patient #4) *sighs* The life of a bookworm is fraught with danger–to one’s heart and one’s sanity.

    Alexa
    thessalexa.blogspot.com
    verbositybookreviews.wordpress.com

    Like

  2. OMG YOU GIVE THE BEST ADVICE. You’d make a great book psychologist (screw the fact that this isn’t a reasonable career. Hashtag rebel.) And so. much. sass. I have a lot of love for this post ❤

    Like

  3. Number 1 and 4 is 100% me. I tend to get emotionally attached to books, especially the ones I love, and end up thinking about them for a week or longer after finishing it. IT’S JUST THAT EMOTIONAL. And the TBR, oh God. The horror of not getting to read all those books.

    Thank you so much for the wonderful advice, doctor. I’m greatly thankful for your help.

    Like

    1. If only there weren’t so many awesome things related to books on the internet to distract me *sigh* Illuminae is like a supernova–it destroys everone who comes in contact with it (in a good way?) I’m terrified of my TBR too. Step by step, book by book, we will do it.

      Like

  4. I can relate to number one and number four, particularly the first one. Have you seen my TBR list on Goodreads? It’s well over 1000 and I’ve got a chocked full bookcase.. and yet still buy more books. I have over 200 ebooks. Every time I finish a book, it’s always a struggle to figure out what to read next – more so if number four is also involved. 😦

    Like

    1. I have a TBR of around three hundred and even that is too much. There needs to be a way to take books off your TBR> Book buying is life… sadly (my bookshelf is stuffed too) What to read next is a very hard problem 🙂

      Like

  5. AHHH THIS IS THE BEST OF EVER. XD You make a fabulous book psychologist there, Shanti. 😉 Except I’m gonna have to ignore the first one because I WILL LIVE FOREVER JUST SO I CAN READ ALL THE BOOKS! HUZZAH! Although search for the fountain of youth is going to take me away from reading so…that’s a problem But I’ll work with it.

    Also I love the answers to #4. XD LOVE.

    Like

    1. Thank you. It’s only my job to provide some mean comfort to all bookworms. Immortality would solve a lot of things (though not big populations) Let me know when you find the fountain of youth, yeah? Yay for recovring from book related heartache!

      Like

  6. XD You know me so well with #1, but I think we know a lot of people who are like this. And I’m slightly like #2, but not a ton. Also, I get terrible book hangovers (not lately though) so I will return to listen to your soothing words when I need them. Until then, these are awesome. *hives*

    Like

  7. I LOVE THIS. So, so much. And I kind of recognize myself in all of those, especially the Patient #3. I want to read so much, but I want to be part of the community a lot, too, and some people seem to be able to do that perfectly together, and that’s crazy amazing. Love love love love love this post!!

    Like

    1. I definitely have times when I’m all of these– and many others. I should do a part two to cover everything, haha. ILLUMINAE is so good. Except I need gemina, now! I’m glad you enjoyed this post 🙂

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s